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     Jerome

Jerome

A superb Latin stylist, a careful linguist, and an eloquent and unscrupulous polemicist, St. Jerome (Eusebius Hieronymus) was the greatest scholar whom the ancient western church produced. Born in 331 of a prosperous landed family whose home was at Stridon in Dalmation (now Yugoslavia), Jerome was schooled at Rome in grammar, rhetoric, and the classics of Latin literature. In 382 in Rome, Jerome became a kind of secretary to Pope Damascus and there undertook with the pope's encouragement the greatest translation project of all: a revision of the crude Old Latin version of the Bible. Over a period of 22 years, he completed the Gospels of the New Testament (in Rome) and the Old testament (in Palestine). The latter he translated from the Hebrew original, having become persuaded that the Hebrew text and canon, and not those of the Greek Septuagint, were the proper authorities for the church.


Sources utilized in these pages may include:
  • Everett Ferguson's: Backgrounds of Early Christianity
  • Walker's: History of Christianity (out of print)

    (These links will take you to book detail pages at Amazon.com)

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